Local restaurant costs increase, meal costs rise for customers

Restaurant owners say meal costs are rising for their customers because restaurants are paying more for goods and services.Georgia’s Northside Owner Allen Natkiel said he sometimes pays triple what he used to for resources.”I had receipts where the cost of brisket had gone up. If memory serves me, $2.69 to […]

Restaurant owners say meal costs are rising for their customers because restaurants are paying more for goods and services.Georgia’s Northside Owner Allen Natkiel said he sometimes pays triple what he used to for resources.”I had receipts where the cost of brisket had gone up. If memory serves me, $2.69 to $6.93. That’s, like, a 273 percent increase,” Natkiel said.Natkiel said business picked up during the pandemic because his food was already made-to-go.”That caused its own set of problems because now you got to make more,” Natkiel said. Natkiel posted an apology to his customers on the Concord barbeque spot’s Facebook page, explaining costs for cooking oil nearly doubled. Natkiel said he wanted to be transparent with his customers.”As opposed to hitting people with a surprise price change that they don’t understand and they think that you’re being greedy and they say ‘Oh wow, your business looks busy and you’re just gauging,’ but it’s not necessarily like that,” Natkiel said. Natkiel said raising the prices was a tough pill to swallow.”You don’t want to be like, ‘Hey customers, I just raised the price of your food because I have a glove issue.’ They don’t really want to hear that.”The N.H. Lodging and Restaurant Association said the supply chain for items like poultry have not caught up since significant slowdowns due to COVID-19 outbreaks in the early months of the pandemic.

Restaurant owners say meal costs are rising for their customers because restaurants are paying more for goods and services.

Georgia’s Northside Owner Allen Natkiel said he sometimes pays triple what he used to for resources.

“I had receipts where the cost of brisket had gone up. If memory serves me, $2.69 to $6.93. That’s, like, a 273 percent increase,” Natkiel said.

Natkiel said business picked up during the pandemic because his food was already made-to-go.

“That caused its own set of problems because now you got to make more,” Natkiel said.

Natkiel posted an apology to his customers on the Concord barbeque spot’s Facebook page, explaining costs for cooking oil nearly doubled.

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Natkiel said he wanted to be transparent with his customers.

“As opposed to hitting people with a surprise price change that they don’t understand and they think that you’re being greedy and they say ‘Oh wow, your business looks busy and you’re just gauging,’ but it’s not necessarily like that,” Natkiel said.

Natkiel said raising the prices was a tough pill to swallow.

“You don’t want to be like, ‘Hey customers, I just raised the price of your food because I have a glove issue.’ They don’t really want to hear that.”

The N.H. Lodging and Restaurant Association said the supply chain for items like poultry have not caught up since significant slowdowns due to COVID-19 outbreaks in the early months of the pandemic.

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